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ST. VINCENT request: scans of any dated village abbreviated cancels overstruck at Kingstown by HORIZONTAL red "A10" will be greatly appreciated

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NEW SOUTH WALES postal history:
1865 double 10d rate via Marseilles cover to The Viscountess Milton Osberton, Worksop, Notts with colourful franking QV 6d purple pair plus pair and two singles DLR QV 2d pale bue pmkd Sydney NO 22 1865, slight peripheral wear.

VICTORIA to NEW BRUNSWICK postal history:
1867 cover to Cambridge, Queens County, New Brunswick marked "via Marseilles by Travelling Post" with QV 1d grass-green, QV 2d lilac-grey, pair QV 6d blue (1/3d rate) tied Richmond OC 28 67 "71" duplex. Melbourne OC 28 67, London DE 14 67, Saint John JA 2 68, Gage-Town JA 4 68 cancels. A rare destination.

ANTIGUA postal history:
1887 cover to South Brooklyn, New York with QV 4d blue CA wmk (SG.23) neatly pmk'd ANTIGUA A/DE 20 87 cds, delightful appearance.

BRITISH HONDURAS postal history
1878 cover front with Germany 10pf red, 20pf ultramarine strip of four and single confirmed by red crayon "1 10" pmk'd HAMBURG 14/12 77 cds to Wm. Guild & Co., Belize showing blue sender's cachet, red London Paid 17 DE 77 transit, BELIZE JA 9 78 arrival. Exceptionally attractive.

MUSTIQUE ISLAND stamps: The currently only known 10c orange MUSTIQUE COMPANY LIMITED mint sheetlet
Produced circa 1971 in fresh unmounted mint condition accompanied by 10c orange label on inaugural first flight cover dated 1 SEP 1971 which terminated the private conveyance service. This is the only known 10c orange mint sheetlet.
2,000 orange labels were printed. 1,931 orange labels used up on inaugural flight covers, 69 labels (or 34 sheetlets) remain unaccounted for. No earlier service 10c orange labels known on cover. Accompanied by scan of BWISC Bulletin article featuring discovery of sheet format for these labels.

CAYMAN ISLANDS postal history
1913 cover (opened 2 sides) to Chas H. Phelps, Milk River Baths (mineral springs, highly radioactive), Milk River P.O., Jamaica with KGV 1d red pmk'd Type 5 GEORGETOWN MY 3 13 (SG lists FE 25 13 as release or earliest date), re-directed in blue crayon to Moneague House Hotel, Kingston and three times endorsed manuscript "Left the Island" with purple "REMOVED/ADDRESS UNKNOWN." (Proud Type 1100) and black "UNCLAIMED." (with stop), red RETURNED LETTER BRANCH, JAMAICA dated 9 JU 13 and presumed sender's name of "Mrs A.J. Robertson" in red crayon at left edge. A rare commercial inter-island cover full of character.

1863 cover marked "Oropouche" from Robert Greenidge (FE 10) to Carrey & Co., Port of Spain with 1861 (1d) rose-red (SG.52) tied oval of bars "2" (Type 0.3 used San Fernando), backstamped 2/FE 13 63 and 1/FE 16 63 cds.
Michael Rego explains that the Post Office at Oropouche in the early 1860's was only manned by a Police Chief Constable, no deliveries were made, these only applied at the town of Port of Spain and San Fernando, the latter having one postmaster and two delivery men. Therefore a letter posted at Oropouche was taken by a government contracted rowing boat to the passing gulf steamer off Oropouche on its was to San Fernando where the postmaster cancelled the stamp. Prior to proper jetties being built the row boats picked up the mail with any passengers about a half mile from the land to the steamer.

GB used abroad at CALLAO, Peru postal history (Ex DALE LICHTENSTEIN)
1876 cover to Cumnock, Ayrshire with Peru 1d green (creased) and w/marginal pair GB QV 9d pale straw Plate 4 (SG.Z50, Cat.400) pmk'd Callao "C38" with blue COLVILLE & Co, CALLAO sender's cachet dated OCT 14 1876 alongside address panel, reverse with A/CALLAO/OC 14 76 and CUMNOCK A/NO 13 76 arrival, some peripheral faults and damaged flap. Ex DALE LICHTENSTEIN

PRIVATE SHIP LETTER 4d RATE, Bermuda postal history
1884 cover with strip of four QV 1d dull rose (SG.22) tied ST. GEORGES "2" numeral duplex dated A/JA 15 84 to St. John's Wood, London showing red LIVERPOOL/A/JA 29 84/SHIP arrival cds, reverse blue HAMILTON B/JA 15 84 and London JA 30 84 cds.
The "Nubian", in transit from Virginia, on an experimental new service for the Union Line, was announced in the local newspaper as calling at Hamilton on 10th January 1884. The ship arrived five days late and sender added this cover to the mailbag (having already written to same addressee with St. Georges B/JA 10 84 on 4 x QV 1d franking cover marked per "Nubian"). Only two covers are known - one dated JA 10 84 (expected arrival) and JA 15 84 (actual arrival)

MIDDLE QUARTERS, Jamaica postmark
NEWLY DISCOVERED manuscript "Middle Quarters" on QV 2d Crown CC (SG.9a) dated Kingston A/JY 29 76 used pending the arrival of the "A.82" numeral, currently unique.
The Middle Quarters office was opened during May 1876 and the A.82 (Type M) numeral stated to have been sent during 1876. The earliest confirmed date of use for A.82 is currently JU 30 1882 on QV 1d Post Card (ex Surtees)

SPAIN/GIBRALTAR combination requiring Forwarding Agent, Gibraltar postal history (Ex MOELLER)
1873 entire headed "Cadiz 20th June 1873" to Poole, England with "p. Archbold Johnston & Power Gibraltar 24 June 1873" manuscript forwarding on reverse with GB QV 2d strip of three affixed and pmk'd "A26" with GIBRALTAR A/JU 24 73. No Spanish charge as sent in another cover to Gibraltar from Cadiz. Very rare as such, Ex MOELLER.
The Carlist Civil War caused intermittent interruptions to the overland route to the UK, and the maritime route from Gibraltar became a more reliable alternative but required the use of a Forwarding Agent in Gibraltar. (Of the Gibraltar/Spain adhesive combination covers currently seen 15 are ingoing to Cadiz, and only 4 are outgoing, all to Malta).

GIBRALTAR postal history
1859 land route "via France" to London with GB QV 1d red strip of three, GB 6d lilac pmk'd "G" with greenish-blue A/JA 7 59 despatch, backstamped London JA 17 59 arrival. Flap with tape stain.

MUSTIQUE ISLAND stamps: The currently only known 10c blue MUSTIQUE COMPANY LIMITED mint sheetlet
Produced circa 1971 in fresh unmounted mint condition, small surface abrasion lower right edge.
550 blue labels were printed and an estimated 525 blue labels used up on the inaugural flight covers which terminated the private conveyance service. Only an estimated 25 labels (or 12 sheetlets) remain unaccounted for. No earlier service 10c blue labels are known on cover. One 10c blue label is illustrated in Nicholas Courtney's book (available internet) alongside later cover which importantly shows the handwriting style of Colin Tennant matching the unique proving cover of the earlier service

1885 completed fabricated cover showing why the PAID AT NEVIS Crowned Circle was used on pairs QV d dull green and singles QV 1d carmine (SG.25,27a) during the period 9/12/83 to 9/9/86 (dates taken from village manuscript markings on loose stamp overstruck with the Crowned Circle): 1885 cover addressed Chas. Hill Esq., English Harbour, Antigua with genuine QV 1d carmine superbly tied full upr. bogus PAID AT NEVIS Crowned Circle to uprate to 2d for the under 300 mile inter-island rate (with further strike alongside) additionally showing bogus NEVIS A/DE 12 85 despatch cds alongside address panel. B/stamped further bogus NEVIS A/DE 12 85 cds and what is now considered extremely dubious ANTIGUA/ A/DE 14 85/ ENGLISH HARBOUR cds (note that this is the same date as found on the E.V. Toeg cover bearing 8 x QV 1d to Sherring, Bristol with RPS certificate). The author being aware that genuine strikes of both the Crowned Paid and Nevis cds have an oily appearance at this time has cleverly used his paint brush to simulate the oily stains within the Nevis despatch cds and soiled the cover at top left for good measure. (Shortages of the 2d adhesive were highly probable at this time as only 1080 copies 2d red-brown CA were invoiced AU 10 82 followed by 5100, 5100, 5160 copies of the 2d ultramarine on NO 6 83, MY 21 84, AU 7 84). No genuine covers with the QV ds or single QV 1d with PA

1930 1d black/blue unused vertical pair (SG.D1h, Cat.2,000), top stamp showing numbers 6536 and 6537, lower stamp showing number 6537.
Two different numbers on same stamp "few and far between" per Hap Pattiz. Partly erased with corrected number, and partially showing second number on same stamp much commoner.

1871 cover marked "per French Steamer Via Marseilles" to London with DLR 1d blue, 1/- reddish violet pmk'd A/COLOMBO/DE 19 71 duplex with clear red London Paid 15 JA 72 arrival, reverse red Galle Paid DE 20 71 transit cds.
The Franco-Prussian War saw the closure of the overland Marseilles 1/1d route to the UK with mail being switched to the Brindisi route (initially 1/4d, reduced 1/- early 1870). The surface route via Southampton stayed at 9d. After the German victory in 1871 two covers are recorded with 1/1d rate by French steamer (other OC 23 71 with 5d, 8d to Aberdeen). These short-lived late uses come just before the introduction of new currency JA 1 1872. The last Pence issue sailing via Brindisi was DE 26 71

The MUSTIQUE ISLAND carriage labels - "No mint copies exist"
This is the only known 10c yellow mint sheetlet of two labels, produced circa 1971, in fresh unmounted mint condition (small gum disturbance at lower right), accompanied by both 10c yellow label on inaugural first flight cover dated 1 SEP 1971 which terminated the private conveyance service, and subsequent Urch Harris "ballot" order form for supply of the four covers. Lord Glenconnor, Colin Tennant, owner of Mustique island conceived the idea of 10c labels to privately convey island mail, with Government consent from the Hon. Hudson Tannis, Minister for Communications & Works, by more flexible regular use of small aircraft to mainland St. Vincent circumventing the slower and less frequent by boat service offered by the Mustique Post Office. Four differing colour same design labels were printed, and stocks ultimately depleted when they were affixed, alongside St. Vincent GPO issues, to SP 1 1971 first day covers for the official inaugural flight Mustique to St. Vincent. Cancelling of the covers was firstly undertaken by Doreen Simon, the Mustique schoolmistress who doubled as the island post mistress, and secondly by the mainland Kingstown G.P.O., and the bulk were carried back to London by a member of the Mustique management team in a suitcase via Luxembourg (accompanied by Princess Margaret). The Bristol based Urch Harris company, famed for their distribution of new issues
The Urch Harris catalogue listed printing quantities as 10c orange (2000), 10c blue (550), 10c yellow (250), 10c mauve (70). The Wilson figures for both blue and yellow are inaccurate and the estimated use for yellow labels used on inaugural flight covers is 234 leaving 14 labels (or 7 sheetlets) unaccounted for. No "earlier" service 10c orange labels are known on cover. Accompanied by scan of BWISC Bulletin article being the UH copied source for quantities affixed to first flight covers.

The ERROR PANE Carnival booklet, St. Vincent stamps
1975 $2.50 Carnival booklet without intended 35c denomination (the four panes adding up to only $2.40 as a second 25c (for 35c) was printed by mistake). A great modern rarity in perfect unmounted mint condition.
The booklet was assembled by the St. Vincent Philatelic Bureau staff (126 girls at its peak in 1978). At a very late stage of collation and early stapling it was noticed there was no 35c value. A corrected pane was rapidly sent from the printers in Holland but some error booklets had already got into the standing order supply chain. The expectation was that no more than 15 to maximum 20 error booklets were in circulation which have still not been found to this day - they are out there!

ST. VINCENT stamps
EXCEPTIONALLY POWERFUL EXAMPLE OF THE DOUBLE SURCHARGE on 1893-94 QV FIVE PENCE on 6d deep lake (SG.60ac, Cat.4,000), very fine appearance used showing part KINGSTOWN cds and "AP" month slug, small lower left corner marginal coloured marks will determine sheet position, reverse with thinned top perfs. 1975 RPS Certificate. Ex JAFFE

HRH Prince Alfred round-world-voyage ended by Fenian assassination bullet, Gibraltar postal history
1867 cover from Tinahely to W.H. Symes, HMS 'Galatea', Gibralter (sic) with pair GB QV 1d red Plate 84 and strip of three, single Plate 85 pmk'd Rathdrum "388" diamond numerals when Ireland was a part of Great Britain, Tinahely and Rathdrum backstamps for MR 16 67 with London MR 18 67 transit. Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, Queen Victoria's second son (1844-1900) was never expected to be King and joined the Royal Navy as a midshipman aged 12. In 1867 he commissioned and commanded the 'Galatea' for a voyage around the world which would include the first royal visit to Australia. On FE 26 1867 the 'Galatea' left Plymouth Sound for the Mediterranean with stops at Lisbon, Gibraltar (MR 14 to 26), Malta, a stay at Marseilles prior a crossing to Rio de Janeiro, returning via Tristan Da Cunha, staying at Cape of Good Hope prior onwards to Adelaide, South Australia with subsequent stays at Melbourne, Victoria and Tasmania. The tour was abruptly curtailed in Sydney NSW on MR 12 1868 when Henry James O'Farrell, a Fenian sympathiser, attempted to assassinate the Prince - the Duke fell forwards on his hands and knees exclaiming "Good God! I am shot; my back is broken". On board was surgeon James Young, M.D. and Assistant Surgeons William L. Powell and William H. Symes (1851-1933 of Tinahely), the two former names being mentioned as giving immediate assistance to His Royal Highness who was tended back to health by six recently arrived nurses trained by Florence Nightingale.
Full details of the voyage can be found in the 487 page book entitled "The Cruise of H.M.S. Galatea" by John Milner and Oswald Walters Brierly. Prince Alfred was the first serious stamp collector in the royal family. He sold his collection to King Edward VII who shared his enthusiasm, who in turn gave it to his son King George V. Keenly expanded by the latter the two collections became the basis of what is now the Royal Philatelic Collection.
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